I did this graphic for Ed Joyce’s story: http://bit.ly/1n9Zo3V

"Driving around Sacramento, I noticed signs telling me bumps were ahead. Looking more closely, they weren’t bumps, but humps, lumps, tables and undulations. The raised hunks of asphalt seem the same, so why all the different names?
“It’s a long history,” said Debb Newton, laughing.
Newton oversees the Neighborhood Traffic Management Program and manages the Speed Lump Program for the City of Sacramento… read more.

I did this graphic for Ed Joyce’s story: http://bit.ly/1n9Zo3V

"Driving around Sacramento, I noticed signs telling me bumps were ahead. Looking more closely, they weren’t bumps, but humps, lumps, tables and undulations. The raised hunks of asphalt seem the same, so why all the different names?

“It’s a long history,” said Debb Newton, laughing.

Newton oversees the Neighborhood Traffic Management Program and manages the Speed Lump Program for the City of Sacramento… read more.

Day jobs, most musicians need one, or two, or three to pay the cost of recording, gear, touring and living. Sacramento artists are finding different ways to entertain their muse and develop useful skills along the way.

Jessie Brune and Blake Abbey call it the “hustle;” that is the practice of pursuing numerous money-making endeavors while they move their band forward.

Brune and Abbey play in Musical Charis, but they also wait tables, teach music, and write scores and jingles for commercial clients.

For other artists it’s less of a hustle and more about finding a career they like that allows enough freedom and flexibility to make music and tour. That’s why Life In 24 Frames guitarist Kris Adams works as general manager of his family’s tractor dealership.

Some day jobs are closer to the goal of doing music full-time than others. Vince Vicari took a job as a waiter at Mayahuel in downtown Sacramento and when his boss found out he could sing traditional Mexican ballads Vicari found himself the resident singing waiter.

Each day job not only helps pay the bills but also provides the artist skills applicable to their work as musicians. Full story on CapRadio Music: http://bit.ly/1r8G3mk

Beatnik Studios Reopen In A New Space: Weddings And Original Art

Full story on CapRadioMusic.org

Lindsay Calmettes and Wes Davis founded the art gallery, studio, event space, music venue and photography collective known as Beatnik Studios six years ago. This weekend they’re re-opening in a new location with a refreshed vision… continue reading.

How Do We Afford Our Rock’n Roll Lifestyle : The way bands produced and funded projects has changed drastically over the past 15 years. Production costs have gone down thanks to cheaper, user friendly software and recording equipment, distribution can happen online without much overhead. Promoting shows and connecting with fans has gotten way easier thanks to social media – but one major fallout of the digital revolution for musicians is people just aren’t paying for the product anymore.
What does that mean for small local bands trying to make it? Many are turning to Kickstarter to rustle up extra cash to fund projects and ease the burden on their own pockets.
If you browse through Kickstarter music in Sacramento, you’ll find 123 projects in the archive. About half of these didn’t make their goal – but the rest hit or exceeded the amount request for funding the project…
Read the full story on CapRadio Music. 

How Do We Afford Our Rock’n Roll LifestyleThe way bands produced and funded projects has changed drastically over the past 15 years. Production costs have gone down thanks to cheaper, user friendly software and recording equipment, distribution can happen online without much overhead. Promoting shows and connecting with fans has gotten way easier thanks to social media – but one major fallout of the digital revolution for musicians is people just aren’t paying for the product anymore.

What does that mean for small local bands trying to make it? Many are turning to Kickstarter to rustle up extra cash to fund projects and ease the burden on their own pockets.

If you browse through Kickstarter music in Sacramento, you’ll find 123 projects in the archive. About half of these didn’t make their goal – but the rest hit or exceeded the amount request for funding the project…

Read the full story on CapRadio Music

(via First Watch: The Polyphonic Spree, ‘Hold Yourself Up’ - capradio.org)
There are worst fates than the one offered in The Polyphonic Spree’s new video for the song “Hold Yourself Up.” A man dies and wakes to find himself in another realm where beautiful women, beaming with joy, dance and sing, uninhibited, alongside their charismatic leader Tim DeLaughter. By the end of the short story that unfolds, the dead man is either brought back to life, where the world is relatively dull, or he emerges on the other side of the afterlife only to find death isn’t the celebration he thought it was.

Either way, watch and you’ll want to join the band. The video was directed by Justin Wilson. “Hold Yourself Up” appears on the Polyphonic Spree album Yes It’s True.

In related news, Polyphonic Spree is playing at Ace Of Spades on R and 14th in Sacramento on Friday.

On Heather’s website there are some behind-the-scenes snippets explaining how he crafted the video.

Here are some additional behind-the-scenes quandaries Heather answered for us:

CapRadio Music: In the “irony is not coincidence” frame, the married couple in the rain is an Alanis Morrissette reference, right? Was that Al’s direction or your idea?

Jarrett Heather: Al offered “bonus points” if I could make fun of Alanis Morissette in that shot, but the visual joke was my design. It seemed obvious to contrast imagery from her pseudo-ironic lyrics against something genuinely ironic. Choosing a symbol for “irony” that you can visually ingest in a fraction of a second while all this other stuff is happening on screen was a huge challenge. I knew if there was even the slightest ambiguity someone on the internet would be asking, “well, is it ironic… really?” Thankfully the burning firetruck seems to make everyone laugh.

Irony

CapRadio Music: Everyone makes mistakes, what safegaurds were in place to ensure no use of incorrect grammar ended up in the final product?

Jarrett Heather: Al was a fastidious proofreader, and I was grateful for his help. Typos slipped into the art now and then (I’m pretty sure I even spelled his name wrong in a render or two), but we got most of them corrected. The few that remain are now classified as Easter eggs rather than errors.

CapRadio Music: Is “Weird Al” really a grammar nut, or did he have grammar consulting when writing the song.

Jarrett Heather: Al didn’t share with me if he did any outside research for the lyrics. I had to do a bit, having forgotten how to diagram sentences 20 years ago. Actually, I just got an email from a professional copy editor, thanking me for using accurate “mark-up” in the typewriter shot. So it’s nice to know that people notice when you take the time to get those little details right. And a relief to know other copy editors probably won’t be writing to complain how I did it wrong.


Yankovic is releasing a video a day this week, starting Monday. His album, Mandatory Fun, was released on Tuesday. 

Full story: http://bit.ly/1t5GRtJ